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writer and change so many novelists as writers. leslie lesley leslie stowe goes and now lives in tucson has helped inform us of who we are. i got that phonecall and i couldn't believe it. almost a year ago in january, phonecall from a teacher who said jeff, they have come into our rooms and confiscated our books. in tucson, the same school district that i was a product in the first years of my life. they had gone into this room and taken out seven textbooks, like rethinking columbus a book that is sold hundreds of thousands of copied, used by kids in rural alaska all the way to rural maine who have that -- and that book was put away into storage. and 11 teachers, almost a dozen teachers were told that they no longer have the right to teach literature from the perspective of mexican-americans, those who have given us our school district from the perspective of rethinking columbus. .. i have to begin, and i will tell you something about our stories. i went to find my story. i had been living outside of tucson for years, and i wanted to come back, working on another book, and dee
administration was very clear on this that he couldn't spend limit leslie and he knew that this war would impinge on his domestic agenda this was well understood. >> guest: and it did. it didn't affect spending that much in 1965. all that many americans die in 1800 were in 1965. it went from 123,000 to 184,000 of to 400,000 in 1966 which was a terrible year and 550,000 at the time johnson leaves office in early 1969. so, even then it isn't enough to win the war. >> host: would also strikes me as interesting is that we think of the war opposition as astute and there is a way that there is no war, if there is a move what is also striking is the kind of opposition to the war among the chattering class is and the people in business this war had an opposition from the is travel to and from the very beginning. >> guest: actually i don't make much of that. it is true there were a lot of professor is engaged in the teaching movement for instance having been on a college campus i can attest to that. but, actually what is striking about 65 is virtually all of the public opinion polls depending on how you a
executive at her and leslie bowman, current executive dirt for their support in the past into the present. this is a magnificent resource in the standard set of monticello is perhaps the leading public history study of slavery in the united states. the study of that subject is really very difficult for a number of reasons. one is that it's so hard to get the documents in the other is a psychological impediments that we americans have that best described by the theologian who also happens to be the father of my editors said americans by her own traditions of the most innocent people on earth. we never do anything wrong as a people and as a country. so becomes difficult for us to learn anything from the past because there was never any right and wrong. we always come out innocent. so when one encounters a phenomenon such as slavery, which seems so palpably evil, we have to find some way to deal with it a leadership happened with paradox, which means we suspend all judgment and say we just can't figure out the people of that time. i mentioned i was spending many months upstairs pouring over
support over the years and also to up the former executive director of monticello and leslie bowman, the current executive director for their support in the past and in the present. this is a magnificent resource. as andrew says, monticello is, perhaps, a leading public history site for the study of slavery in the united states. that -- the study of that subject is really very difficult for a number of reasons. one is, it's so hard to get the documents, and the other is the psychological impediments that we americans have in that, as described by one hold, the theologian who also happens to be the father of my editor, he said, americans buy our own traditions of the most innocent people on earth. we never do anything wrong as a people and as a country. it becomes very difficult for us to learn anything from the past because there was never any right or wrong. it's always, you know, we always come out innocent. and so when one encounters a phenomenon such as slavery, which seems so palpably evil, we have to find some way of dealing with it, and we usually rapid in that word, paradox,
much, i'm mary leslie. >> thank you. >> i'm david -- [inaudible] the chief of joint operations. i work at the northwood headquarters. >> thank you. >> commander 12th mechanized brigade and i command a force at helmand. >> james stephenson, i'm currently a member at the royal college of defense studies but came out of afghanistan about two-and-a-half months ago having been deputy commander army within the nato training mission in afghanistan. >> right. well, thank you very much, indeed let's begin by asking a general question. how are things going in helmand in terms of the level of violence? give us a rundown of how things are going and when you think it will get better, stay the same, get worse? who will like to begin? >> i'll start, and then i think i should give the recent task force commander the floor. my judgment is that our progress is being delivered, that we are increasingly seeing an apparatus that is becoming more confident and that the levels of violence are beginning to go down and that we are also seeing much more ownership by the afghan national security forces across th
and the corporate sector represented by my friend of over 30 years, leslie horton. [applause] thank you. so before we start today, let me just review the format. charlie and stu are going to come up after they have been formally introduced, and they're going to speak each for 15 minutes, and then we're going to try and make this very interactive. and i hope that you'll ask lots of questions. we're going to have roving microphones, as we always do, and i'll be fielding those questions. so just, please, identify yourself when you ask the questions, and we'll try and get to as many of them as we can. i'm just going to make one comment with regard to a survey form that is, that are at your table. this is a complimentary breakfast, complimentary leading authorities and our sponsors. we ask that you do only one thing before you leave today, and that is to complete that form which'll take you less than 60 seconds. and before you leave hand it either to your leading authorities representative at your table or your host. thank you very much. and now let's start the show. let's roll the video. >> leading au
yourselves? >> thank you very much. i'm mariot leslie, representative to nato. >> and i am david capewell, chief operations. i work at the northwood reporters. >> i command it home and -- >> jane stevenson, currently number at the royal college defense studies of afghanistan months ago. within the nato training commission within afghanistan. well, thank you earning much indeed. let's begin by asking a general question. how are things going in home and in of violence? give us an idea of how things are going and whether you think you will get better come to state the same, get worse. who would like to begin? >> i think i should give the recent task force command. >> my judgment is that progress is being delivered, that we are increasingly seeing enough to the charity apparatus becoming more confident and vibrant. the levels of violence are beginning to go down and we have also seen much more ownership by the afghan national security forces across the whole of them. i think that is true across also the rest of afghanistan and i also think we are seen much more independent thought rdf gives t
sites that are vulnerable to future disasters. leslie to survey the damage, we have got to remember that superstorm sandy is a sign of things to come. in this changing climate, the reluctance in this committee to look at the changes in global temperature is very difficult to understand. making weather like sandy more and more common. we had the opportunity in this committee to make sure the northeast recovers and rebuilds, i thank my colleague, all of them, who had taken an interest here. the experience that we have learned. >> that legislation you describe is very appropriate and i am looking forward to meeting with details when you get them. -senator whitehouse. >> i will be briefer than my colleagues. i was here for an earlier hearing and made a similar statements. i don't want to be redundant the hurricanes and the hit rhode island hard, but 9.5 ft crest at fox point at fox point was the highest ever on record, we have 130,000 homes and businesses lose power which is a significant portion of a stake of 1 million people, the southern coast of rhode island was hit hardest, the wes
on the population now is the one child policy it means you have leslie burr coming into the market and that goes to this critical issue of what we did in the middle-income trap how you increase the productivity and keep growth going when you start to get five to six, $7,000 income because some of the things we have to be flexible when you open the service sector would actually help the united states the trade patterns, the logistics, the supply chain investment and is talking with one of them today or last night whose major company was brought up by a chinese company you are going to see the whole for what's important by these people to recognize not just in trade or growth but with its investment, repentances, tourism, logistics change, the system is going to go through a transformation to beat each of those provide some opportunities >> look, the u.s. has been growing at maybe 2% which is not good, and that's the fastest of pretty much the whole advanced world and that tells you what is wrong and has been wrong and it is a mess for both of a developed. >> what do you make of this -- >> if you
. so, would you like to introduce yourselves? spent i mariot leslie. >> thank you. >> i'm david capel, the chief of joint operations. i work at the northwood headquarters. [inaudible] >> thank you. >> james stevenson, i'm currently a member of the royal defense studies at came out of afghanistan about two and half months ago, the deputy commander army within the nato training mission in afghanistan. >> well, thank you very much indeed. let's begin by asking you a general question. how are things going in helmand, in terms of the level of violence? give us a rundown on how things are going, and whether you think it will get better, stay the same, get worse. who would like -- >> i will start and i think i shall give the recent -- commander the four. my judgment is that progress is being delivered, that we are increasingly seeing an afghan security operatives -- apparatus that it became more confident and vibrant, that the levels of violence are beginning to go down. and that we are also seeing much more ownership by the afghan national security forces across the whole of it. i think tha
back here. >> high, leslie griffin with the alliance for health care competitiveness. dr. embrey, you mentioned it, a couple times in response to my trust are probably the panelists could say a word or two about the role the private sector plays in working with the u.s. military and efforts to export our body of health care knowledge to other countries. >> now, it was addressed to me. operationally i'm a big policy want, so i very rarely have an opportunity to engage at the ground level. i know that there aren't a lot of nongovernmental organizations, which would include industry partners that offered generously their resources to support needs of the affected population, whether it's drugs or supplies or whatever. there are innumerable work of nations out there that specifically their mission is to receive process and deliver donations both financial personnel and material to those making decisions on the response. this specifically i get below the state level of dirt and pretty. >> most of our experience has been again during routine engagement, more specifically large disaster resp
was doing my job without any complex adventures for the beings would make money leslie on the taxpayer backs, i wasn't necessarily told i was wrong. i was told my concern was misplaced. we didn't need to worry about it they said that they factor to untrue figurative pat on the box. he would not never risk over that of the public policy purpose of this program. and i really want to stress this is not just the bush people, this exact same mantra came after the election by the obama gave her treasury official. the exact same word cleaning to this greenspan notion the reputation of risk is that we need. i remember thinking to myself, where have these guys been the last couple years? how could they a map of the things who put profit over everything. in particular, the reputation. then i realized where they had been. merrill lynch. bear stearns, bank of america, goldman sachs, goldman sachs, goldman sachs. everywhere you look to someone from goldman sachs. i realize they brought the wall street ideology within to government and one of the reasons why we saw this incredibly deferential ballot on su
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12

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